Archive for July, 2011

DMT week 1

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011
Holstee manifesto

www.holstee.com/manifesto

DMT is dive master trainee in case you were wondering.

There is no timetable or schedule for the dive master course. It takes as long as it takes. It can be finished in as little as three weeks. Some of the guys here have been here for as many months. I think that may have something to do with all the dives you do while on the course being “free” (included in the course fee). I’m aiming to be finished in six weeks by which time I expect to have logged about a hundred dives. I’m up to about thirty so far.

So far I’ve spent four days shadowing one of the dive masters, done two or three dives every day except today, and made a start on the book work. I’ll do the first (dive guide) exam tomorrow and start assisting instructors on courses the day after.

I haven’t taken any photos since starting the dive master course so had nothing topical to head this post with. But I came across the Holstee manifesto today and it sums up pretty nicely where I’m at. The image is embedded with their permission. Thanks guys :-)

This isn’t China

Sunday, July 3rd, 2011

Five months ago, even two weeks ago I expected to be in China, somewhere around Chengdu today. Instead I’m back in Koh Tao and starting a dive master course today.

In the last 5 days I’ve been back to Bangkok to collect the stuff I thought I wouldn’t need for just a week on Koh Tao, made a visa run to Laos and returned to Koh Tao. Expensive and time consuming running around. Last night I arranged some “long term” accommodation, paid a month in advance. This afternoon I’ll shell out at least the deposit for the dive master course. Probably within a couple of days I’ll buy a dive computer. Add in the diving I’ve already done and that’s almost two months budget spent in two weeks. Ouch. On the bright side, I won’t have to spend much on food for the next two months so when I head for China at the end of August I won’t be very much over budget.

I have stolen two months out of the rest of my trip. Two months that I was going to spend dancing tango in Buenos Aires. I figure the potential to earn money from the dive master qualification in the future (perhaps in Cambodia?) is worth delaying my return to the milongas for.

I’m not planning to return to the UK next year when my round-the-world ticket runs out. When I bought it I thought I would stay in Buenos Aires when it ran out. Now I’m not sure. Maybe I’ll stay in Buenos Aires, possibly elsewhere in South America or perhaps in Asia. In the last few years I had quite a lot of freedom to do what I wanted (outside of work) and what I wanted to do was walk, or dance, or fly. Through travelling I’m expanding the palette of things I might want to do and where I might want to do them. I would still like to stay in Buenos Aires and dance tango but there might be something I want to do more. I owe it to myself to find out and I’m having fun doing so.

I haven’t stolen time out of the rest of my trip after all; just reassigned it. That running around may have been time consuming and expensive but it was also enabling.

Nowadays I encourage everyone I meet to reject the conventions of getting a job and settling down. Instead I urge them to find a way to travel, to find and to do the things they truly enjoy. Shift the work/life balance firmly to the life end of the scale. I meet lots of people who have gone travelling. They fall into four main groups:

  1. The ex-pats who have done their travelling and settled into a new routine in a new part of the world.
  2. The (mostly) mid-lifers like me who have quit jobs, sold up and  gone travelling. Some on round-the-world tickets, some on a more casual basis. Most have no real idea of when their journey will end, or where, or what they’ll do when it does.
  3. The late twenty-something/early thirty-somethings on an extended trip who are definitely going home. Maybe to the same job they left, maybe to something new. Perhaps they’ll be starting a family but they’ll almost certainly be settling down.
  4. The gap year brigade. Already at or planning to start university. Few know what they’ll do afterwards.

Curiously I’ve met almost no two week holiday tourists. Perhaps because it’s the wrong time of year for them? To those in the third and fourth groups I say it’s not too late. Go home if you must, but don’t settle down. Reject convention, defy expectations. Explore, make real your dreams.

That was a bit of a ramble. I’m not sorry.