Posts Tagged ‘milonga’

Here’s the plan

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Lots of people are asking me what the itinerary for my imminent round-the-world trip is. I launch into an enthusiastic spiel and one of two things happens:

  • their eyes glaze over and they stop listening about half way through.
  • they get excited and ask more questions and after a while I reach the point of shrugging my shoulders and saying “… and then I’ll see.”

Hopefully you’re in the second group.

I have an itinerary because I booked a OneWorld Explorer ticket and I had to name airports and dates. I have an itinerary because I had a rough idea of the places I wanted to go and approximately how long I might want to spend in each place. The itinerary is flexible and likely to change once the travelling starts. The ticket is good for upto one year. There are very few details filled in yet between the flights. There are some highlights and must-see/must-do things and lots of vague arm-waving inbetween.

Date changes are freebies, changing my mind on the routing will cost me money – about £100 per change. Sadly there is no reciprocity between the airlines and me in this respect. They have changed two of my flights already and did not pay me £200.

So the plan at the moment is:

  • London-Delhi, Delhi-Kathmandu for a two week Everest base camp trek. This is organised by Above the Himalayas Trekking and I booked directly with them, cutting out a UK agent and saving some money in the process.
  • Kathmandu-Delhi, Delhi-Bangkok for a ten week tour around SE Asia with my friend, Hannah, who will be blogging about the trip from her perspective at travelpod. We have an approximate route worked out for this, based on information we found at travelfish. Briefly it’s a week in Bangkok including a Thai massage course at Wat Po, a few days in Koh Chang for Thai New Year, north through Thailand, south through Laos and Cambodia, north through Vietnam, topped off with 2 weeks lazing on a beach somewhere in Southern Thailand.
  • Two more weeks in Thailand by myself. I have various ideas for how to fill this time. We’ll see…
  • Bangkok-Beijing for three weeks in China. I have a very rough idea of how to get from Beijing to Shanghai involving Qi’An, Chengdu and half a dozen other cities. Probably this will be a challenge. A friend who knows much more about China than me says this will be hard outside of Beijing and Shanghai because of the language. It will probably involve lots of train journeys. We’ll see…
  • Shanghai-Melbourne for a couple of nights in Australia. Why only a couple of nights? Because I’ve been before and didn’t plan to stop in Oz at all on this trip. However, I couldn’t get from China to New Zealand in one day and will have to spend at least one night in Australia. So I’ve routed via Melbourne and will have a couple of nights there. Hopefully this will give me a chance to catch up with a tanguera friend I met last year in Buenos Aires, and maybe get to a milonga or two.
  • Melbourne-Queenstown for three weeks in New Zealand. How I get from Queenstown to Auckland is completely unknown right now. I’ll work it out much nearer the time. I have another tanguera friend to visit in Auckland and again, hopefully get to at least one milonga.
  • Auckland-Santiago de Chile. Not looking forward to this one; it is a LONG flight. I’ve got a few nights in Santiago and then double back westwards to Easter Island for a five night stay. Then it’s back to Santiago for another night. This extra night is courtesy of one of those airline imposed changes; they changed one of the flight times making it impossible to get from Easter Island to Lima in a single day.  Well, it would have still been possible but only by reducing my stay on Easter Island to two days, or by extending it to nine days.
  • Santiago de Chile-Lima for 3 weeks in Peru. I’ll go to Cusco and then Machu Picchu of course, but whether by train/bus or by trekking the Inca Trail is still to be determined. Yes, I’ll have to decide very soon – if it’s not already too late – because I’ll have to book the Inca Trail. That would pin me down to specific dates. I’m already tied down pretty tight with Easter Island so it could be argued that fixing another date for the Inca Trail would be no extra hardship. But that is approximately five months into the future and I don’t really want to be that constrained.
  • Then there’s a bit more uncertainty; I may go to Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands or I may not. Money will be a big factor in that decision. All the flights up to this point except Delhi-Kathmandu-Delhi are on the round-the-world ticket. Getting from Lima to the Galapagos would be a separate trip. I had thought I’d book a LAN airpass for the intra-South America flights, but found I couldn’t because I didn’t book it at the same time as the RTW ticket. Opinion on the web is divided about whether or not this should be possible. Anyway, if I’m under budget by enough when I’ve done what I want in Peru then I might manage a trip to the Galapagos Islands.
  • Finally sometime around the middle to end of September I’ll return to Buenos Aires. Ah, proper tango, at last! A couple of months of milogas and much more learning/improving my Spanish than last time. After that travel all around Argentina until about the middle of February and then return to Buenos Aires for another month. The travelling will include Ushuaia and if I’m really really lucky an Antarctic cruise. I’ll decide in that “final” month whether to use the final Buenos Aires-London sector of my RTW ticket to come home. Maybe I will, maybe I won’t. Perhaps I’ll stay in Buenos Aires or perhaps by then I’ll have decided there’s somewhere else that would suit me better. We’ll see…

Great, you were in the second group!

That’s the plan so far. I have just a few more days in the UK and then the tenants move into my house and I hop on a plane to Delhi. My transit visa for India arrived today, the Nepal visa is already stuck in my passport, I’ve had jabs against just about everything and I’ve sold or otherwise gotten rid of most of my stuff. Just another dozen or so boxes to go :-)

I’ve got three more nights of tango to look forward to, one of jive and maybe one of West Coast Swing. And then several months of probably no dancing of any sort that I’m used to. Withdrawal symptoms here I come.

Have you done a trip like this or been to any of these countries? Are there any must-see places or must-do things you would recommend in the countries I’m visiting?

Not so many

Thursday, December 2nd, 2010

It is fairly amazing the large number of porteños (residents of Buenos Aires *) who don’t dance tango. Many non-Argentinians assume that “everyone” in Buenos Aires dances tango but in fact the percentage of the population who regularly attend milongas is miniscule. They grow up, live and work surrounded by and listening to the music but very few actually dance to it. My guestimate is that out of the three million or so people who live in the city, and additional ten million or so in the surrounding districts, fewer than 10000 actually tango. I can’t find any published numbers to support this, it’s just based on observation of the number of weekly milongas and the number of people in each one.

Depending on which list you use there are about 130 milongas per week in Buenos Aires. There are actually more because not all of them get listed. Let’s call it 20 per night plus half as many again which aren’t listed. So that’s 30 milongas per night. I’m assuming the unlisted ones are smaller than the well known, publicised, listed ones. Let’s assume an average of 100 porteños  in each milonga each night. 3000 porteños dancing each night. Maximum. Some dance more than once a week, or dance in more than one milonga per night. So 10000 seems like a plausible upper guestimate for the number who regularly dance tango in a milonga. That equates to about one third of one percent of the population of the city. Actually I think the real number is less than that, but I’m trying to big it up.

Does anyone have a more accurate number? “Do you dance tango” wasn’t one of the questions on the census form on 27 October this year. They wanted to know what the floor in your dwelling was made of, but not whether you danced tango on it, or anywhere else. Given that tango was declared part of the world’s intangible cultural heritage on 30 September 2009, and both Argentina and Uruguay are eligible for United Nations funding to maintain and promote the dance it might have been worth including a question about it on the census form.

This post was prompted by TangoBora’s discovery, reported in her blog here that not everyone in Buenos Aires dances tango.

* See my glossary for the meaning of porteño and other “funny” words.

Fog, traffic, tango – part 2

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

I’m in Turkey for the Istanbul tango ritual, staying with a tanguera friend I met in Buenos Aires. This is the story of the second day of my visit.

***

Awaking at lunchtime on Saturday I look out the window to more fog. And on the highway 100 metres away, traffic. There are festival classes and seminars we could go to but sightseeing is the order of the day for me. In addition we have a wedding to go to this evening, starting at 7pm in the Asian side of Istanbul. Two bridge crossings in one afternoon, followed by another two for the festival milonga is a silly waste of time so our sightseeing is confined to the Asian side of the city. We go to Maiden’s tower, normally a nice viewpoint for both sides of the city, but today really only the Asian side is visible. The European side is almost completely lost in the fog. The drive there takes about an hour. Afterwards we spend nearly another hour getting to the Kadikoy part of the city and wander around for a while before sampling some traditional Turkish food. Another 45 minutes gets us back to the flat to change and head off to the wedding. Now we’re running late but another similarity between Buenos Aires and Istanbul is timekeeping. We arrive at the wedding venue, very close to where we spent the first part of the afternoon at about 7:30pm, a good 30 minutes before the bride and groom make their entrance. About 3 hours later we leave and rejoin the traffic across the Bosphorus to the Saturday night milonga.

This one is held on an artificial floating island called Suada. There is a ferry service from the shore on the European side to the almost invisible in the fog floating resort. The milonga venue is much larger than YEM on Friday night and there are about 400 people here. There are rows of seats on three and a half sides of the square space, a bar, the entrance and stairs to an upper seating level on the other half side. Through the floor to ceiling glass walls there is nothing visible in the murk. There is a nice wooden floor but probably due to the humidity in the air from the fog, it is incredibly sticky. Several people liberally scatter talc on the floor and lubricate the soles of their shoes but the effect doesn’t last long. I dance one tanda and decide I probably won’t dance many more.

The dancing tonight is more nuevo than on Friday night with more couples moving in random directions, lots of dancing large, lots of high flying Comme il Fauts and more than a few collisions. I am reminded of Brownian motion. The music is traditional tango, arranged in tandas and again just a little on the loud side. The exhibition performance is earlier than I expect given the scheduled 6am finish and is called “Generations”. In addition to last night’s performers it includes father to two of them, Gustavo Naveira, and his partner Giselle Anne. It’s far too choreographed and drags on far too long for my liking although the comedy elements are slightly amusing,

By the time the exhibition performance is over the fog has thinned considerably and the European side of the city can be seen twinkling in the murk. Possibly coincidentally the floor is now less sticky but the dancers are no better behaved. Despite me dancing very defensively in collision avoidance mode two of my partners get stabbed by followers and/or trodden on by leaders. I don’t hear any apologies.

We stay until about 3:30am, just missing out on a Pugliese tanda which starts as we leave. There is still traffic on the roads but no delays and we’re home in less than 40 minutes.